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Sen. Roberts: Trade is more than a product crossing a border

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Trade is more than a product crossing a border; it’s vital to American agriculture and numerous associated American jobs. That’s what U.S. Senator Pat Roberts, R-Kan., Chairman of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry told the Washington International Trade Association Tuesday. Roberts then participated in a agriculture trade discussion with Ambassador Max Baucus, former Chairman of the Senate Finance Committee and U.S. Ambassador to China; and Grant Aldonas, former Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade and currently the Executive Director or the Institute of International Economic Law at Georgetown Law.

“There is a great deal of frustration in farm country because we are missing opportunities to grow our exports,” Roberts said. “I believe that the renegotiation of NAFTA could provide just that opportunity. Strengthening and modernizing NAFTA should result in even stronger economic growth for the United States and for Canada and Mexico.”

“Trade is more than a product crossing a border. A seed planted in a field might ultimately become a meal for a family, but in between you’ll find the combine that harvests it, the facility that processes it, and perhaps most important the people employed at every step of the way.”

“U.S. agriculture has grown because of agreements like NAFTA, and from the farmer in the field to the grocer in the store, American workers have benefited from that growth.”

Senator Roberts is also a member of the Senate Finance Committee, with jurisdiction over U.S. trade policy. Roberts has relentlessly highlighted the vast benefits of NAFTA to American agriculture, including multiple conversations with President Trump, U.S. Trade Representative Bob Lighthizer, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and other high-ranking officials in the Administration.

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