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Living Soil film documents soil health movement

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The soil health initiative has been on the rise for farmers for many years. To increase awareness, The Soil Health Institute released a 60-minute documentary, Living Soil, that captures the history — and significance — of the soil health movement.

“Never have I seen, among farmers, such a broad quest for [soil health] knowledge as I’m seeing now,” says Barry Fisher of the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. “And this interest in soil health extends far beyond the farm gate,” adds Bill Buckner, President of the Noble Research Institute and Chair of the Board of SHI. “Consumer packaged goods companies, environmental groups, financial investors, and many others are recognizing the importance and value of improving soil health.”

Living Soil captures the background of the current soil health movement and its momentum, beginning with painful images of the Dust Bowl, and then transitions to personal experiences of innovative women and men who are managing their land to enhance soil health. The film features rural and urban farmers from Maryland to California, selling everything from corn to bouquets, united by their care for the soil.

The documentary is directed by Chelsea Myers, founder of Tiny Attic, a video production company located in Columbia, Missouri, that specializes in documenting real moments and real people. Myers has evolved as a visual storyteller for a diverse range of projects as a director, producer, editor, illustrator, cinematographer, and animator. With a fiercely creative spirit, Myers and her Tiny Attic crew pursue meaningful work regionally and around the world.

“This is a film for everyone who cares about our natural resources,” says Wayne Honeycutt, President & CEO of the Soil Health Institute. “The innovative farmers in this documentary are showing us the way to grow our food in concert with the environment.”

The documentary is available online. You can also download the documentary on their website

Any views or opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not reflect those of AGDAILY. Comments on this article reflect the sole opinions of their writers.
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