University of Missouri

Mizzou zinc research may address livestock & human infertility

· June 14, 2018

Infertility affects about 20 percent of the U.S. population and can be incredibly costly; it also costs the livestock industry billions of dollars each year. Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that zinc plays a key role in promoting fertility in males, a discovery that has implications for improved in vitro fertilization and […]

MU research shows rainfall forecasts can be more precise

· June 13, 2018

Meteorologists may soon be “right as rain” thanks to a more accurate rainfall system University of Missouri researchers have developed. The system improves the precision of forecasts by accounting for evaporation in rainfall estimates, particularly for locations 30 miles or more from the nearest National Weather Service radar. “Right now, forecasts are generally not accounting […]

Study examines how ag can work with Amish, Mennonites

· April 12, 2018

A new study from the University of Missouri has found that agricultural professionals face challenges as well as opportunities when working with Amish and Mennonite communities. Through interviews with agricultural professionals and Amish farmers, researchers have identified several factors that are vital for improving coordination between the two. Relationship building and discussions between communities about […]

University of Missouri researchers to tackle ticks in cattle

· August 29, 2017

It has been estimated that more than 80 percent of beef cattle are affected by ticks. Anaplasmosis, which is passed by ticks through their bite and saliva, infects the red blood cells and causes severe anemia, fever, and weight loss; it is known to be fatal. Currently, prevention and control of this disease involves chemical […]

Human IVF could get cheaper thanks to piglet study

· July 20, 2017

A serendipitous discovery in pig research at the University of Missouri may just have made human in vitro fertilization (IVF) more affordable. It is estimated that parents seeking to have children through in vitro fertilization (IVF) spend between $12,000 and $15,000 each session plus the cost of medications, which could average between $3,000 and $5,000. […]

MU engineers build robot to study drought resistance

· April 4, 2017

With a $20 million NSF grant to study climate change and how corn maintains plant growth during drought conditions, University of Missouri engineers have developed a robot that is changing the way scientists study climate variability, crops, and plant composition. “I’ve been working with CAFNR assisting them in experiments where we helped to create 3-D […]

University of Missouri: Cover crops sensitive to herbicides

· March 22, 2017

Many corn and soybean growers have found it challenging to establish fall-seeded cover crops. A team of University of Missouri researchers may have discovered why. The researchers conducted field studies over three consecutive years to evaluate the impact of more than two dozen residual herbicides on eight cover crops, including Austrian winter pea, cereal rye, […]

MU scientists discover how nematodes hijack soybean plants

· February 15, 2017

How are cyst nematodes intruding soybean plants? University of Missouri researchers recently found that the parasites are secreting “mimicked” peptides they create that act like the soybean plant’s signaling systems. Soybeans are a major component for two-thirds of the world’s animal feed and more than half the edible oil consumed in the United States, according […]

Syngenta: Palmer amaranth will be biggest threat in 2017

· January 6, 2017

The most notorious weed, Palmer amaranth, will be the number one threat to growers this year, according to Syngenta agronomists.  Not only has the weed continued to spread northward to new states, it also is now showing resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action. Palmer amaranth has earned its title as one of the most […]

Mizzou research uses nuclear method to study corn rootworm

· December 21, 2016

Researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered the mechanisms corn plants use to combat the western corn rootworm. How did they find it? By using advanced nuclear methods, of course. “The western corn rootworm is a voracious pest,” said Richard Ferrieri, a research professor in the MU Interdisciplinary Plant Group, and an investigator at […]

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